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Peach State Endocrinology

Diabetes and Prediabetes Specialist

Endocrinologist - Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2

Endocrinologist and Diabetes Specialist
located in Peachtree City, GA

Diabetes Type 1 , Type 2, and Prediabetes

More than 34 million Americans are living with diabetes, a group of chronic illnesses characterized by high blood sugar. At Peach State Endocrinology in Peachtree City, GA, Dr. Evgenia Korytnaya (Dr. K), a diabetes specialist, treats all types of diabetes, such as Type 1, Type 2, gestational diabetes and prediabetes. Schedule online or call to schedule an appointment with Dr. K today.

Learn more about different types of Diabetes at American Diabetes Association.

Diabetes and Endocrine Function (Endocrine Society).

Learn more about Diabetes Complications and Diabetes Treatments at Endocrine Society. 

Type 1 Diabetes

What is it:

Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disorder where the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. This results in little to no insulin production, leading to high blood sugar levels. Autoimmune diabetes, or type 1 Diabetes occurs at every age and in people of every race.  Sometimes adult onset type 1 diabetes is referred to as latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA).

Symptoms:

  • Excessive thirst and hunger
  • Frequent urination
  • Fatigue
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Blurred vision

What causes it?

The exact cause of Type 1 Diabetes is not fully understood, but it is believed to have a genetic component combined with environmental triggers, such as viral infections.

Diagnosis and Treatment:

Diagnosis involves blood tests to measure blood sugar levels and specific autoantibodies. Treatment includes insulin therapy through injections or an insulin pump, regular blood sugar monitoring, including continuous glucose monitoring systems and adopting a healthy lifestyle.

Learn more about type 1 Diabetes at American Diabetes Association.

Learn more about use of Diabetes Technology and Continuous Glucose Monitors at Endocrine Society. 

Type 2 Diabetes

What is it:

Type 2 Diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. It occurs when the body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain normal blood sugar levels.

Symptoms:

  • Excessive thirst and hunger
  • Frequent urination
  • Fatigue
  • Unexplained weight changes
  • Blurred vision

What causes it?

Type 2 diabetes is mainly the result of two problems:

  • Cells in muscle, fat and the liver become resistant to insulin As a result, the cells don’t take in enough sugar.

  • The pancreas can’t make enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels within a healthy range.

Exactly why this happens is not known. Being overweight and inactive are some of the key contributing factors.

Diagnosis and Treatment:

Diagnosis involves blood tests and may also include an oral glucose tolerance test. Treatment includes lifestyle changes like weight management, exercise, and a balanced diet. Oral medications, non-insulin injectable medications (GLP-1 agonists and GIP/GLP-1 agonists) and sometimes insulin therapy may be necessary. Some patients are able to decrease the number of medications and stop insulin therapy when guided appropriately by a diabetes expert. 

Learn more about type 2 Diabetes at American Diabetes Association. 

Learn more about Cardiovascular Disease and type 2 Diabetes at Endocrine Society.

Prediabetes

What is it:

Prediabetes is a medical condition in which a person’s blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. It is often considered a warning sign that a person is at increased risk of developing diabetes in the future. Prediabetes is also sometimes referred to as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or impaired fasting glucose (IFG), depending on how the diagnosis is made.

Symptoms:

Prediabetes may not exhibit noticeable symptoms, making regular screenings crucial. Many people with prediabetes may not be aware that they have it until they undergo blood tests as part of a routine check-up or screening for other health issues.

However, in some cases, people with prediabetes may experience mild symptoms related to elevated blood sugar levels. These symptoms may include:

  • Increased Thirst (Polydipsia): Some individuals with prediabetes may notice increased fluid intake.
  • Frequent Urination (Polyuria): Prediabetes can lead to increased urination, particularly during the night.
  • Increased Hunger (Polyphagia): You may feel hungrier than usual, even after eating.
  • Fatigue: Fatigue and low energy levels can be associated with prediabetes.
  • Blurred Vision: High blood sugar levels can affect the lens of the eye, causing temporary vision problems, such as blurred vision.
  • Slow Wound Healing: Prediabetes can affect the body’s ability to heal wounds, so you may notice that cuts and sores take longer to heal.

What causes it?

Prediabetes is primarily caused by a combination of genetic factors and lifestyle choices. Genetics play a role in how your body processes glucose, affecting your risk of developing the condition. Lifestyle factors, such as poor diet, lack of physical activity, and excess body weight (especially around the abdomen), can contribute significantly. These factors lead to insulin resistance, where the body’s cells don’t respond well to insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar. As a result, blood sugar levels rise, but they don’t reach the threshold for a diabetes diagnosis. Prediabetes can often be prevented or managed through healthy lifestyle changes, including a balanced diet, regular exercise, and weight management.

Diagnosis and Treatment:

Diagnosis is made through blood tests like the A1C test, fasting plasma glucose test or oral glucose tolerance test. Lifestyle changes, such as weight loss, exercise, and dietary improvements, can help prevent or delay the onset of Type 2 diabetes.

Learn more about Prediabetes at American Diabetes Association.

Gestational Diabetes

What is it:

Gestational Diabetes occurs during pregnancy when hormonal changes can lead to insulin resistance.

Symptoms:

Gestational Diabetes may not present with symptoms, but some women may experience increased thirst or urination.

What causes it?

Hormonal changes during pregnancy contribute to insulin resistance.

Diagnosis and Treatment:

Diagnosis involves glucose tolerance tests during pregnancy. Managing blood sugar levels through diet, exercise, and sometimes medication is crucial to ensure a healthy pregnancy and prevent complications.

Learn more about Gestational Diabetes at American Diabetes Association.

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